Insurance revisited and cramped muscles: No easy solution

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Like many things in life, you never forget your first “Charley Horse.” The first time I had one, the contraction in my left calf muscle had me writhing in bed, at 4 am, with had no idea what to do. After breathing for a few minutes, like I saw my mom do in Lamaze class, the cramp released, but the leg still felt bruised for several days. Clients often ask how to treat or prevent Charley Horses, considering 60% of the adult population has reported having them, I thought finding an answer would be easy, but that is not the case (1). This article will cover the current thought on what to do if you find your muscles cramping in the night, but first would like to respond to several questions and comments from last month’s article on insurance reimbursement. Continue reading…


Massage Therapy and the Affordable Care Act.

The conversation typically goes something like this, the client says, “I would like to bill my insurance for an appointment.” I reply, “Were you in an auto accident or do you have a personal injury claim?” The usual response, “No, but…,” then I have to break the bad news, “I’m sorry, currently, the only way we can bill insurance in Kentucky is when your injury is part of a settlement and there has been a referral from a medical professional. The referral could be from your doctor, chiropractor….” This usually ends the conversation, occasionally the person will schedule regardless, but their visit will be paid, like the majority of appointments at Apex, with cash.  The word currently is highlighted in the conversation because the inability to bill third party insurance by massage therapists might soon change. Continue reading…